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Archive for the ‘satellites’ category: Page 97

Apr 25, 2016

DARPA to service satellites in space

Posted by in categories: energy, military, robotics/AI, satellites

DARPA plans to service orbiting satellites.Satellites operators have been longing for it for decades, and DARPA (once again?) is turning their dream into reality: on March 25, one of America’s most futuristic agency announced it would launch a public-private partnership to provide in-orbit servicing to geosynchronous satellites, both commercial and military.

The program dubbed Robotic Servicing of Geosynchronous Satellites (RSGS) will be a major breakthrough for the satellite industry world. Since Sputnik’s launch, the biggest weakness of satellites was that, once on orbit, nothing could be done if something went wrong or once the fuel tank ran dry. A rather embarrassing issue when considering how pricey such platforms are. The only maintenance and repair operations performed to date were manned (Hubble telescope, ISS). The agency announced that it would allocate RSGS $500mn over the next few years, supplemented by commercial partner investment.

DARPA’s RSGS is composed of two elements: the arm that will dock and manipulate the satellite, and the space ship carrying it. Regarding the first element, the agency will provide its Front-end Robotics Enabling Near-term Demonstration (FREND) technology. The prototype of the FREND arm was built for the agency by the California-based company Alliance Space Systems. The robotic arm will enable it to dock with satellites and carry out maintenance.

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Apr 23, 2016

WTF Was That Thing Near the International Space Station?

Posted by in categories: alien life, mathematics, media & arts, satellites

“The station regularly passes out of range of the Tracking and Relay Data Satellites (TDRS) used to send and receive video, voice and telemetry from the station,” a spokesperson for NASA told ValueWalk.

The only problem with this explanation, of course, is that it’s so much more boring…”

It is, of course, highly unlikely that this was some alien ship. That said, those tracking and relay stations are fixed and known locations. Also, the range and power of the ISS communication systems are well known, non-classified public domain knowledge. I suck at math, but it should only be a matter of taking the exact time and duration of this outage and comparing it to the tracking and relay station stats.

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Apr 22, 2016

NASA seeks industry ideas for an advanced Mars satellite | Phys.org

Posted by in categories: satellites, space, space travel

nasaseeksind

“NASA is soliciting ideas from U.S. industry for designs of a Mars orbiter for potential launch in the 2020s. The satellite would provide advanced communications and imaging, as well as robotic science exploration, in support of NASA’s Journey to Mars.”

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Apr 18, 2016

Report: One Web to Build Satellites in Florida

Posted by in category: satellites

Space tourism … and much more.

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Apr 10, 2016

Google Invents Global Communications Satellite Constellation that could protect users from Wire Taps & Beyond

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, satellites

Although Google has been filing patents for the design of an advanced high-altitude balloon network for some time now (examples one and two) and CEO Larry Page talking up Project Loon with Charlie Rose at a TED Conference, it appears that they’re simultaneously dreaming of another Moon Shot project related to a communications satellite constellation wrapped around the globe.

In 2014 Google signed a 60 year lease with NASA airfield and hangers. The Verge reported at that time that “Google may use Hangar One, as well as two sequentially named hangars on the airfield, as a space for research, development, assembly, and testing of technology related to robotics, aviation, space exploration, and other new fields once it moves in. Perhaps Google’s recent patent application discovered at the US Patent Office for a new satellite constellation is one of the many projects that they have on their drawing board.

Google’s patent FIG. 1B noted below shows us a schematic view of exemplary orbital paths or trajectories of the satellites in their proposed system.

Continue reading “Google Invents Global Communications Satellite Constellation that could protect users from Wire Taps & Beyond” »

Apr 8, 2016

SpaceX successfully lands its rocket on a floating drone ship for the first time

Posted by in categories: drones, satellites

SpaceX has finally landed its Falcon 9 rocket on a drone ship at sea, after launching the vehicle into space this afternoon. It’s the first time the company has been able to pull off an ocean landing, after four previous attempts ended in failure. Today’s success is a crucial milestone for SpaceX, as it shows the company can land its rockets both on solid ground and ocean.

This is the second time SpaceX has successfully landed one of its rockets post-launch; the first time was in December, when the company’s Falcon 9 rocket touched down at a ground-based landing site in Cape Canaveral, Florida, after putting a satellite into space. Now that SpaceX has demonstrated it can do both types of landings, the company can potentially recover and reuse even more rockets in the future. And that could mean much greater cost savings for SpaceX.

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Apr 6, 2016

Modernizing Manufacturing: How to Build the Satellite of the Future

Posted by in categories: futurism, satellites

Satellite manufacturing today is a lengthy, meticulous process; its high tech nature, and the cost in time and money make advances slow compared to sectors like the mobile industry. But an explosion in demand for connectivity and other space services is driving the need for ever-more capable satellites. It is at this crossroads, that bold new ideas are being forged.

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Apr 5, 2016

How expandable astronaut habitats could pave the way for private space hotels

Posted by in categories: habitats, satellites

Next week, astronauts on the International Space Station are getting a brand new room. Called the BEAM, short for Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, the room is launching on top of one of SpaceX’s rockets on Friday; it will then be attached to the ISS sometime within the next four months. The BEAM, which is created by private company Bigelow Aerospace, will remain deflated during launch, but once in orbit, it will inflate up to four times its size, providing more overall volume for the interior of the ISS.

The BEAM isn’t a permanent addition to the space station, though. It will only stay attached to the ISS for two years, and the astronauts will go inside the habitat very rarely. That’s because the main goal of the BEAM is to test out if this expandable habitat technology actually works. A successful mission could be the first step to something bigger: an era when expandable space habitats orbit the Earth, allowing for scientists and tourists to visit these “space hotels.”

The concept of expandable spacecraft isn’t new. In the 1960s, NASA launched a series of expandable communication probes called the Echo satellites, which looked like big metallic balloons. The satellites inflated in space and turned into mirror-like reflectors that bounced signals from one spot on Earth to another. Since then, NASA and other private companies have toyed with the idea of scaling up expandable spacecraft so that they could house humans in space.

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Mar 28, 2016

DARPA Seeking Private Partners for In-Orbit Servicing Program

Posted by in categories: business, government, robotics/AI, satellites

Looking for partners.


[Via Satellite 03-28-2016] The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is reviving its in-orbit servicing efforts through a new public-private partnership program called Robotic Servicing of Geosynchronous Satellites (RSGS). Under the RSGS vision, the partners would join a DARPA-developed modular toolkit, including hardware and software, to a privately developed spacecraft to create a commercially owned and operated Robotic Servicing Vehicle (RSV). DARPA would contribute the robotics technology, such as the previously developed Front End Robotic Enabling Near-Term Demonstration (FREND) robotic arm, expertise, and a government-provided launch. The commercial partner would contribute the satellite to carry the robotic payload, integration of the payload, and the mission operations center and staff.

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Mar 26, 2016

Space Innovation Congress

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, government, information science, satellites

The is a Space Technology Conference and Exhibition, taking place in London on 7–8 April 2016. It is set to showcase the most cutting edge technologies and uses of Space Technology providing insight from over 50 speakers sharing their unparalleled industry knowledge and real-life experiences.

This year’s Space Innovation Congress will be highlighting the most innovative advancements in Space technology and will look at how these are being applied to many industry verticals from farming to banking, and the practical case studies that are coming out of these projects.

With user cases with dedicated tracks covering the entire Space exploration and Earth observation ecosystems: Satellites, Big data, Crop monitoring, Space debris, Maritime surveillance, Space weather and its impact on banking systems, Biomedical, Commercial space collaboration and Telecoms.

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